‘Why are we testing healthy people and using such invasive tests?’

March 2, 2021

CASTING DOUBTS: “As a trained ear, nose and throat nurse and although I’ve haven’t been in clinical practice for many years, I wouldn’t feel comfortable doing a nasal-pharyngeal swab, and yet I see Circo people dressed up in suits without knowing what their qualifications are, who they are, how long they’ve trained, what they’ve trained in, what exactly they are inserting inside our noses and down our throats.” Retired nurse Debi Evans in conversation with UK Column anchor presenter Brian Gerrish on the nasal swabs. This is a shot of a man receiving a nasal-pharyngeal swab. Picture by Raimond Spekking.

 

 

 

A RETIRED nurse who specialised in ears, nose and throats has given some forensic analysis on the reliability of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test given to detect whether someone has contracted Covid-19.

Debi Evans was speaking to Brian Gerrish of UK Column on 16 February when that day the World Heath Organization published a yellow warning about the validity and the efficacy of the PCR test and that it doesn’t tell someone if they are sick.

Dr Cary Mullis, the creator of the PCR test, who died in 2019, is attributed to have said this: “Anyone can test practically anything with a PCR test, if you run it long enough, with PCR if you do it well, you can find almost anything in anybody.”

Ms Evans that the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies had already said that the PCR tests were unreliable and that other countries were not using them as confidently, particularly the lateral flow test.

‘Why are we testing the healthy and ignoring the sick?’

She said: “Why are we testing healthy people and ignoring the sick is something I have always wanted to know and now we know these tests are completely unreliable, especially the lateral flow test, which France and other countries are refusing to use.

“Not only are we using a completely, ineffective test, but now the PCR tests are being questioned and what they are saying – which will make a huge difference to the figures – is that anyone who presents with symptoms that are asymptomatic and comes back with a positive test should then be further assessed face to face with a physician to discuss the symptoms, if any, that they have.

“That test should be reassessed because it could be because that patient is asymptomatic, hasn’t got any active virus so is of no danger to anybody and doesn’t have to be isolated.

“If we look at the WHO advice, we should see cases actually dropping substantially if the British Government take any notice, which they haven’t already.”

Ms Evans was very concerned with how invasive the nasal swab and the dangers of it being used and connecting with the circadian plate in the brain.

As the writer of this article, I daily pass a Covid testing site on the way to work it looks so dreary you would want to bolt in the opposite direction and at worse, it looks like an internment camp.

The retired nurse is not convinced why these type of swabs are necessary when there were alternatives used in the recent past which are non-invasive.

‘What’s wrong with a sputum, stool or urine test?’

“In my day we did simple things like a sputum test – in which somebody spits a bit of sputum into a pot or a bit of spit.

“We did urine tests so somebody would pee into a pot. We did stool tests, where somebody would poo into a pot. It wasn’t very pleasant but you know what, it’s a test and that’s non-invasive. That is something we are donating that can be tested.

‘There are all sorts of things on the ends of those swabs’

“The nasal swab on its own is a very invasive test – you are putting a six-inch stick (a cotton wool bud) and people have actually analysed the cotton wool buds and seen there are all sorts of things on the ends of those swabs.

“It is not just about removing stuff from your body, ie DNA, it is what is being up the nasaly pharynx – very close to the Cribriform Plate,. If you damage the Cribriform plate, you have a serious injury and some people (including children) have been injured from these nasal-pharyngeal swabs.

‘You cross-contaminate if you use swab in two places’

“As a trained ear, nose and throat nurse and although I’ve haven’t been in clinical practice for many years, I wouldn’t feel comfortable doing a nasal-pharyngeal swab, and yet I see Circo people dressed up in suits without knowing what their qualifications are, who they are, how long they’ve trained, what they’ve trained in, what exactly they are inserting inside our noses and down our throats.

“I know people who have a throat swab done and had that throat swab re-inserted into their naso-pharynx, well that’s a no no in my day as a nurse. You would never use one swab for two sites because you would cross-contaminate so the whole idea of the swab doesn’t sit well.”

‘Are they harvesting for DNA or implanting some sort of device?’

She concluded on the PCR test: “We are we testing healthy people and why are we having to use such invasive tests? Is it because we are DNA harvesting or is it because we are mining data? Is it because we are implanting a medical device, perhaps, that might be able to give a central database a quantum computer information about our bodies? I don’t know but I don’t like it.”

  • THE reader might be advised to hear the observations made about Dr James Geordano, who is the chief of the Neuroethic Studies Program and a sub-program in Military Medical Ethics on about the 32nd minute.
  • THIS is based on the interview between Debi Evans and Brian Gerrish of UK Column and should be read as such.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: